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Sentence Structure Quiz

Sentence Structure Quiz

 

Sentence Structure Quiz Answer

(Answers may vary in Part 1)

 

If you would like to review this grammar, click here.

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To have, to exist 有 yǒu Grammar

有 is a useful and common word in Chinese. It has two main meanings, “to have” and “to exist.”

The sentence structure for “to have” is,

  • Subject + 有 + object
  • Subject + 沒有 + object

It means someone or something has (or does not have) something or someone.

 

Examples,

车。(Tā yǒu chē.)

He has a car.

他们两个孩子。(Tāmen yǒu liǎng ge háizi.)

They have two children.

没有钱。(Wǒ méiyǒu qián.)

I do not have money.

女朋友吗?(Tā yǒu nǚ péngyǒu ma?)

Does he have a girlfriend?

 

The sentence structure for “to exist” is,

  • Location + 有 + object
  • Location + 沒有 + object

When we use 有 to say that something exists, typically a location replaces the subject.

 

我的学校很多学生。(Wǒ de xuéxiào yǒu hěnduō xuéshēng.)

There are many students in my school.

加州很多人。(Jiāzhōu yǒu hěnduō rén.)

There are a lot of people in California.

这个房子里没有人。(Zhège fángzi lǐ méiyǒu rén.)

There is no one in this house.

家里水果吗?(Jiā li yǒu shuǐguǒ ma?)

Is there any fruit at home?

 

Use the “can-do” list to check if you learned this grammar.

Can-do checklist:

⃞        I can understand when to use 有 yǒu.

⃞        I can place 有 yǒu correctly in a “to have” sentence.

⃞        I can place 有 yǒu correctly in a “to exist” sentence.

⃞        I can understand the meaning when people use 有 yǒu in a simple conversation.

 

Simplified Chinese Version

 

Traditional Chinese Version

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Sentence Structure

Here is the basic Chinese sentence structure: Subject (S) + Verb (V) + Object (O).

But when adding time, location and time duration, it is important to know where to place them correctly.  

  1. Let’s add “time when”:

Subject + Time when + Verb + Object

“Time when” is referring to a specific point in time. Note the difference between “time when” and “time duration.”

Place “time when” either right before or right after the subject.

  1.  Let’s add “location”:

Subject + Time when + Location + Verb + Object

  1.  Let’s add “time duration”:

Subject + Time when + Location + Verb + Object  + Verb + Time duration

 

Use the “can-do” list to check if you learned this grammar.

Can-do checklist:

⃞    I can understand the basic Chinese sentence structure and put the parts in the correct order.

⃞    I can recognize when people use “time when”, “location” and/or “time duration” in a Chinese conversation.

⃞    I can place “time when” correctly within a sentence.

⃞    I can place “location” correctly within a sentence.

⃞    I can place “time duration” correctly within a sentence.

⃞    I can correctly place all three of them (time when, location and time duration) within a sentence.

 

Simplified Chinese Version

 

Video Credit: Carol from Growmommy.com

 

Traditional Chinese Version

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Time Order in Chinese

The Chinese time order structure is very different from that of English. It is important for students to know the Chinese time order structure.

When we created this infographic, we gave a new name for this time order. We call it the “Time Order Slide”. The “slide” goes from the bigger time range to the smaller time range. For instance, if you would like make an appointment at 3pm on Thursday. There are 3 time frames involved  in this appointment, 3 o’clock, PM and Thursday.

Let’s go down the “slide,” from big to small. First, the biggest time frame is the one for Thursday, “one day, 24 hours”. Second, the time frame “PM” means the from noon to midnight. Lastly, “3 o’clock” represents “one minute”. So, the correct time order in Chinese, following the time order slide, will be “Thursday, PM, 3 o’clock” which is “星期四 下午 三点。”

 

Use the “can-do” list to check if you learned this grammar.

Can-do checklist:

⃞        I can recognize time-related vocabulary, including year, month, date, day of the week, a period of time in a day, o’clock and minute, in Chinese.

⃞        I can recognize time-related vocabulary, including year, month, date, day of the week, a period of time in a day, o’clock and minute, when people use them in a Chinese conversation.

⃞        I can say year, month, date, day of the week, a period of time in a day, o’clock and minute, in Chinese.

⃞        I can write year, month, date, day of the week, a period of time in a day, o’clock and minute, in pinyin/Chinese characters.

⃞        I can put time-related vocabulary in correct order.

⃞        I can make an appointment in Chinese.

 

Simplified Chinese Version

 

Traditional Chinese Version

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